Archive for the 'Admin' Category

Links 2016-09-19

More stuff on cloud and service architecture.

Links 2016-07-18

Thoughts and recipes to build and run systems and services.

  • How to build stable systems
    The first decision is easily the most important. It is one of ideology: the developers are in control of the software. Not the other way around. Managers are not in control of the software. Product Owners are not in control of the software. Developers are.
  • The 15-point DevOps Check List
    The checklist could help you proceed with setting up a DevOps culture but don’t consider it as a unique way to proceed with your organization transformation.
  • 10 Philosophies for Engineers
    In this post and podcast episode, I convey some loose philosophies about modern software engineering. These are strong opinions weakly held. I welcome debate and discussion.
  • 3 Reasons AWS Lambda Is Not Ready for Prime Time
    When I first sat down to write my microservice using Lambda, I really wanted it to be the greatest thing since sliced bread. […] Sadly, it was too good to be true.
  • Microservices & Einradfahren
    Zu meiner großen Enttäuschung muss ich nun feststellen, dass die Leute in der IT, bzw. Developer wie sie heute genannt werden, mit den gleichen Denkmustern arbeiten wie die Business Kasper.
  • Creating a Microservice? Answer these 10 Questions First
    Microservices appear simple to build on the surface, but there’s more to creating them than just launching some code running in containers and making HTTP requests between them.

DevOpsDays Kiel 2016

I finally attended my first DevOpsDays in Kiel. I cannot compare to other events in the DevOpsDays series, but in any case it was a wonderful small one-track IT conference. One with the cosy atmosphere because with less than 200 attendees you can talk to everyone. We had two great days with a beautiful venue on the science campus, good catering, several sponsors, competent speakers, and last but not least a professional and dedicated organizing team.

One interesting observation: DevOps certainly has become mainstream already; because even IBM tells us how to do it.

To see more impressions take a look at the flickr albums. For summaries of the talks read Manuel Pais’ articles on InfoQ (Day 1, Day 2).

OSDC 2016

This year was my second OSDC, and the first one as a speaker. Thanks to Netways for organizing this great conference (and also for inviting me to talk there). The conference archive for 2016 with all presentation slides is now online.
Read the rest of this entry »

Chemnitzer Linuxtage 2016

CLT2016-Tasse

Und noch ein kleiner Hinweis: Bei den Chemnitzer Linux-Tagen sind nun seit einigen Tagen die Audio-Aufzeichnungen der Vorträge online.

Getreu dem Motto „Es ist Dein Projekt“ fand ich viele Vorträge recht kleinteilig und bastelig (à la „Meine drölfzigste Raspberry Pi Lampensteuerung“). Meine persönlichen Highlights waren dann auch zwei Vorträge, die mehr zu meinem eigenen Arbeitsbereich passen: Valentin Haenels Vorstellung des AWS Federation Proxy (leider noch ohne Audio) und René Kochs Übersicht zu oVirt.

Links 2016-01-19

A few good articles on cloud development and operations.

  • Sort out deployment first, Lars Wirzenius
    It is tempting to start a new project with the interesting bits, but it’s often a mistake. One of the first steps in a new project should be to sort out deployment: getting the software installed and configured so it can be used.
  • 5 AWS mistakes you should avoid, Michael Wittig
    Useful to evaluate your own AWS web application.
  • 12 Fractured Apps, Kelsey Hightower
    Once Docker hit the scene the benefits of the 12 Factor App (12FA) really started to shine. […] Unfortunately legacy applications, including the soon-to-be-legacy application you are working on right now, have many shortcomings, especially around the startup process.
  • Moving a team from Scala to Golang, Jim Plush
    You can jump into any Go project and know immediately what it’s doing. Do I miss immutable types and some of the great features of Scala? Sure do, but I think the maintainability side of the story is too great to overlook with Go.
  • Ansible 2.0 Has Arrived
    After a year of work, we are extremely proud to announce that Ansible 2.0 (“Over the Hills and Far Away”) has been released and is now generally available. This looks like a big step forward. Finally Ansible gets a usable parsing/error reporting and with the new execution strategies you no longer have to update all hosts in lockstep.
  • What’s in a Name?, Geoff Huston (ISP Column Dec 2015)
    What’s the difference between .local and .here? Or between .onion and .apple?

New Year’s Crypto Cleanup

Just did some housekeeping of my server I want to document.

Most importantly I got myself a Let’s Encrypt TLS certificate for this blog (and my mailserver), so you no longer have to deal with my self-signed cert to use HTTPS. There has been some discussion about their official client tool, but for a first release it does not seem to be too bad; at least it is written in Python and not in Java or Scala etc. The ACME protocol itself looks sensible and I look forward to more lightweight implementations in the future.

Having a public CA also gave me the opportunity to add an HTTP Strict Transport Security header. Now the next step would be HTTP Public Key Pinning, but that is still out of range for a non-professional website; because Let’s Encrypt may still change their intermediary CA certificate and I also do not have a backup CA that I could use in case of a problem. (BTW, nice HPKP advice on the Let’s Encrypt community site.)

Somewhat related I also expired my old 1024 bit PGP key from  as well as the PGP key of my former work address at DECK36. (BTW, here is a nice description how-to edit gpg key expiration dates by George Notaras.) In order to reach me securely please use my current PGP key (0x4dc5e2280a327754, also on my Contact page).

Interesting Programming Languages

One personal goal this winter is to do more programming in beautiful languages.

At this moment I am quite excited about Python 3, Perl 6, and Go. Read the rest of this entry »